Cessna for sale Australia

VIC
Cessna 172M Skyhawk II

Cessna 172M Skyhawk II

$84,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1976
  • 5024.6 HRS
  • 2825.5 HRS
QLD
Cessna 182Q Skylane

Cessna 182Q Skylane

$184,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1980
  • 3703 HRS
  • 1798.6 HRS
VIC
Cessna 210G Turbo Centurion

Cessna 210G Turbo Centurion

$139,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1967
  • 5140 HRS
  • 1406 HRS
Sold
Cessna 182A Skylane

Cessna 182A Skylane

$139,000
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1957
  • 4510 HRS
  • 360 TSN Factory New HRS
Sold
Cessna 182P Skylane

Cessna 182P Skylane

$179,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1975
  • 6450 HRS
  • 382 HRS
QLD
Cessna 150M

Cessna 150M

$52,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1976
  • 9005.1 HRS
  • 1167.2 HRS
Sold
Cessna 150G

Cessna 150G

$44,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1967
  • 6076 HRS
  • 1085.6 HRS
Sold
Cessna 150L

Cessna 150L

$59,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1971
  • 5174 HRS
  • 861 HRS
Sold
Cessna 152

Cessna 152

$59,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1978
  • 9950.4 HRS
  • 790.8 HRS
Sold
Cessna 172M Skyhawk II

Cessna 172M Skyhawk II

$109,900
  • Single Pistons (GA)
  • 1975
  • 9020 HRS
  • 560 HRS

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FAQs

Learn the answers to some of the most Frequently Asked Questions relating to buying and selling aircraft.
Contact us for more information, or if you need your specific questions answered.

Everything in life has a ‘price’. In financial terms, when selling an asset in a relatively free market, the price paid for the asset should equal the least that the selling market is willing to bear, and equally, the most that the buying market will bear.

As such, assuming the advertising is well-executed to the market and the information about the aircraft is accurately described, it is simply the price that will determine the outcome (all other conditions aside).

When a seller tries to present an aircraft to the market at an inflated price, the market will keep looking. And if the Buyer presents an offer that is unrealistically short of a fair market price, the Seller rejects their advance. It’s a ‘dance’ that could be made shorter and far less stressful, if both parties understood the real value of the asset. Try our valuation calculator today – or call us for a valuation of your aircraft. It could save you a lot of valuable time.

Aircraft sell in a matter of hours if the price is right and demand is very high. And in months or years if the price is set unrealistically or the market doesn’t value the asset. Our opinion is that striking a perfect balance would see your aircraft sold within 2-4 weeks of first being fully advertised.

Most sellers believe that employing an aircraft broker means taking the hassle out of the sale (less time and energy dealing with potential buyers), ensuring that the marketing of the aircraft is targeted to an appropriate audience – and of course, negotiating the best sales result, in less time.

And this is all largely true.

But there are so many more reasons why employing the services of an aircraft broker should be considered. The least commonly understood reason is that the broker’s main role is to act as an impartial facilitator of the agreement between the two parties. From the very first enquiry, through to settlement and final delivery of the aircraft, the broker’s key role is to identify and mitigate of the risk of errors, misunderstandings, anxieties and conflict (the potential for unwanted legal action or loss) to either party during all stages of the process.

Although the broker does not take up the legal risk if a dispute arises between the seller and buyer, the professional broker is expected to be knowledgeable and experienced in order to reduce the risks of significant disputes to almost zero. In any event, the broker also becomes a professional witness who’s presence will significantly and further reduce the likelihood of disputes being based on misinformation or distortions.

That’s correct. It’s not sales. We are in the 2020s – not the 1980’s!

The best facilitation of any agreement requires human skills; active listening – and noting and clarifying the potential areas of misunderstanding to ensure that each step of the process is undertaken impartially and fairly to both parties. Where conflict arises (and it can arise very easily) the broker needs to ensure both parties either reach further agreement, or that they terminate the agreement without (or with minimal) loss.

In short, great brokers will ensure they steer both parties away from any pitfalls along the way – and towards a smooth transaction pathway every time.

In short, no. Although there are some obvious similarities, cars and motorcycles have a far less complex regulatory / maintenance regime, generally over less number of years and with far less components involved. While some ultralight aircraft and gliders can be relatively simple, certified singles, twin engine, turbine aircraft and helicopters can have an extremely complex array of powerplant, rotor/propeller, airframe and avionics components that need to be documented, checked and properly marketed in the sale.
The need to accurately and truthfully market an aircraft for sale is important from the Seller’s perspective, and the requirement to trust but accurately verify the information provided by the seller is vitally important from the perspective of the buyer.

Everything in life has a ‘price’. In financial terms, when selling an asset in a relatively free market, the price paid for the asset should equal the most that the selling market is willing to bear, and equally, the least that the buying market will bear.

As such, assuming the advertising is well-executed to the market and the information about the aircraft is accurately described, it is simply the price that will determine the outcome (all other conditions aside).

When a seller tries to present an aircraft to the market at an inflated price, the market will keep looking. And if the Buyer presents an offer that is unrealistically short of a fair market price, the Seller rejects their advance. It’s a ‘dance’ that could be made shorter and far less stressful, if both parties understood the real value of the asset. Try our valuation calculator today – or call us for a valuation of your aircraft. It could save you a lot of valuable time.

Aircraft sell in a matter of hours if the price is right and demand is very high. And in months or years if the price is set unrealistically or the market doesn’t value the asset. Our opinion is that striking a perfect balance would see your aircraft sold within 2-4 weeks of first being fully advertised.

Selling?
We can help.

Contact us to get an obligation free valuation.